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in restaurants in california since 1995. in 2010, we strengthened the law, through a local ordinance. so this is not really anything new. this has been on the books for quite some time. the other thing i wanted to add is that even if there were no tobacco product being used in the hukas -- and i do believe that having the tobacco products there, open in a container, it would seem that it would be very likely that the customers would put the huka tobacco product on the hot stones if there are huka pipes present. that this is sort of similar to the phenomenon of electronic cigarettes, which now were recently banned by the airport commission and they're banned on airplanes. and this is even though there's no tobacco that is used in electronic cigarettes, the problem is that it gives the public the impression that smoking is permitted in areas where it's not permitted, and it also gives the impression to the public that there's no consequence to smoking in areas where smoking is not permitted. tobacco is still the number one cause of preventable deaths in the united states, and the two major
in north bay mare in shock after a fire breaks through his law office. investigators are now on scene. putting the brakes on helping californian drivers to help and their tickets. >>> the chemist at the center of a crime lab scandal. >>> yes ladies and gentleman it looks like it is going to get warmed. we still have fog and low clouds along the shoreline. we will have all the details on your forecast in a few minutes the mayor of vallejo large cruise by a fire at his law office. marrow's b. davis has use the building on wall mystery to practice real estate law for years. this morning he was a visibly upset at one. tiering up. the police chief says of the cause of this fire is suspicious. >>> every small damage throughout is suspicious fire at this time. it's under investigation it started in the front waiting room. it also stacaused damage near an office area. >>> a mom who allegedly abandoned her daughter in a shoplifting attempt in morgan hill. she was with her live-in month old son was now in child protective services. i mean daughter. the daughter is now saying of the dra
on these changes to the law before they were introduced in state houses across the country. >> the united states of alec. and -- >>> we had a drum roll of media attention that said if you don't stop and watch the debates that night you're really missing out on an important cultural moment. >> announcer, funding is provided by, carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org." anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman
has spent much of his military and law enforcement career battling human smugglers. last year engaged in 350 high-speed pursuits involving drug and human smugglers. they look at a these people, th these humans as product. they don't care about their safety. they leave them for dead. they get in a wreck and walk away. >> reporter: arizona law is cracking dn on illegal immigration. >> the impact has been so tremendous, not only billions of dollars and impact to our budget, but the crimes that are associated. many crimes committed against the illegals themselves. >> reporter: the sheriff and the student one trying to enforce the law and the other trying to stay a step of it. angelica hernandez this week begins work on her master's degree at stanford. >> reporter: she graduated from arizona state, despite losing a scholarship twice because of arizona laws restricting documents for illegal immigrants. >> it's something that gives you so many different quantities and strengthens you because you learn to overcome so many things. >> reporter: now, she is filling out paperwork to apply for pre
identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city, the way the run ed run campaign did. so i think that is one the issues and improving our good government and ethic laws in san francisco. >> miss breed, would you like to address the question? do you want me to repeat it? >> yes. >> sure. a recent chief civil grand jury report, at the request of supervisor campos the city conducted a comparison of laws identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as su
, expired or possibly contaminated. less than 3% of online pharmacies actually meet state and federal laws. >>> speaking of medications, all of us have a few in our cabinet, unwanted, unused, probably old prescription pills. today is the day to get rid of them. you can drop them off, no questions asked, as part of the d.a. national prescription drug takeback day. check justice.gov/dea. last april. 276 tons of medication were collected. >> remarkable. the supreme court is back in session beginning monday and a whole landmark of new cases they will be hearing. >> but as joe johns reports, a lot of people are focusing on the big one that closed out the last session. >> at the beginning of the next session, the supreme court will be closely watched for signs of strain between the justices or anything else that suggests things may have changed since the health care ruling arguably was the biggest opinion by the court's order since bush versus gore more than a decade ago. right after the supreme court's health care decision in june, chief justice john roberts joke fod a colleague he would find a
to zero in on what is at stake here. since president obama's health care law was enacted, 3.1 million people under the age of 26 are now covered by their parents' plans, andñr preventiv care also is available. many benefitted from prescription drugs. >> seniors who fall in the coverage gap known as the donut help will start to get help. they receive $250, paying for prescriptions, helping with the donut hole. >> 5 million seniors have saved money on the prescription drugs since the law was started. he also plans to slow spending on medicare. >> i have strengthened medicare, we have added years to the life of medicare. we did it by getting rid of taxpayer subsidies and insurance companies that were not making people healthier. >> by 2014, the law requires everybody to have health insurance, whether they purchase it themselves or through their employers. and insurers can't deny you if you have a pre-existing condition or increase your rate. the law has become a cornerstone of the obama campaign. >> i refuse to eliminate health insurance for millions of americans who are poor, and elder
the uc davis school of law in 2004, following a clerkship with judge cal braise of the united states court of appeals for the second circuit. interest include election law, administrative law, statutory interpretation, constitutional law and property and natural resources law. he is a resident of san francisco's mission district. we are honored to work chris almendorf. [ applause ] >> thank you very much and thank you to all of the candidates who are here today. we're very fortunate to be joined by six candidates and what i hope will soon be seven. all of the candidates have agreed to ask their supporters to be respectful of other candidates and the audience and to maintain quiet during the forum. i ask you to respect that commitment. every aspect of this forum will be equally fair to all participating candidates. as everyone here knows candidate debates are often limited to latitudinal appears and personal attack. our debate focuses on critical areas of policy disagreement among the leading candidates. so this end the league of women voters of san francisco and the san francisco pu
we have spent the last few weeks telling you about the suppress sieve voter laws hastily passed by republican-led state legislatures claiming to be defending democracy against the threat of voter fraud. we have also told you that the laws themselves are the real threat to our democracy, because they would by design disenfranchise hundreds of thousands of voters. well, on thursday, republicans finally found evidence that the myth of voter fraud is very real and they found it right in their own party. investigators in six florida counties have opened a criminal inquiry into hundreds of cases of suspected voter fraud committed by a gop consulting firm. the republican national committee hired to register republican voters for the november 6th election. the fraud accusations against the firm strategic allied consulting began when 304 registration forms were dropped off at a palm beach elections office. 106 of them were flagged as fraudulent. after that initial discovery, possible election fraud was also reported in florida's os coloo sa, pos coe, santa rosa lee and clay counties. if
the law. >> the founders were very clear on this. the judiciary should be insulated from political pressure. you have the executive, you have the legislative branches, both of them elected. but the judiciary should be insulated. what say you to that? >> what i say to that is that they were meant to be independent to make law or to execute law on their own. and when that happens, the balance of power has to come in, either the legislative branch has to hold them accountable. we have a split legislature. so they couldn't do it. or the governor needs to hold them accountable. the governor won't do it. the opinion has never been executed. so it's the people of iowa who have to hold them accountable. we agree that the judiciary should be free of politics. well don't want them looking over their shoulder except to stay within their constitutional parameters, because god help us all if we allow a court to be independent to make law and execute law, because we call that tyranny, not liberty. and that's what we -- >> there are also those who would argue that the word that you use is activis
or the observation of mr. warfield. and also the observation of mr. nee. because the sunshine law, 65.24 is far more clear than the public record section as defined in the state law. and i would like to point out that it says in section 67.36 of sunshine that, the ordinance supersedes all other local laws. this is the governing law of official conduct in san francisco. so if i go to the san francisco police department and i want to look at records of a case that is closed. i shouldn't have any problem from the san francisco police department saying no, we can't share any tape recordings with you. or we can't share any evidence that was collected both audio and video with you. where in fact if the case is closed, those are public records. specifically if i want to apply those to commissioner harris. this is important. and i am surprised you looking at me shocked. this is what you get if you spend 10 months on ross mirkarimi railroading him and 10 days trying to push this through. and it doesn't give us an idea of the information and i excuse me me mr. st. croix i was not able to read the documents of
to hold someone who is a threat to themselves or someone else for 72 hours. we need to enact laura's law and mr. dufty is working on that and finding housing for these individuals but not to keep going back to the economy but one solution is improve the economy so we can improve these people's lives. thank you. >> thank you. >> l the homeless problem it's very, very interesting because you know some cities don't -- i think one of the reasons we do have a problem is because of the wonderful social services that we have here in this city and unfortunately as someone who has sat on several committees it's disheartening that just across the east bay, even if you go to oakland, it changes drastically and i think it's one of the reasons people come to san francisco. do they all live here? absolutely not. and i think we have to get tough with this issue and the housing authority truly needs some restructuring, so that they can do their mandate which is to house people because that's another issue, but there is money missing there, so i think we have to be tough with that and it's like tough
of the university of michigan law school. different years. larry is older than i am. and is a little bit younger, but the three of us all graduated from law school. now one of us has been invited back to campus to speak. go figure. three nationally syndicated talk show hosts with a lot of audience and none of us have been invited back. every five years i invited back to harvard to be the person that this town. that the chief of staff and director of the peace corps and communications director. duval patrick is the governor of massachusetts. grover norquist. it's like groundhog day every side -- every five years before us identify our class. we have the only two conservatives the gun and of harvard. the rest of us just throw things at us. it's always amusing commute the series is very good. come back in november bummer doing when it -- william henry harrison. it's a very short program. you don't want to miss that one. and such a presidential merit i visited his tomb. his tomb is in a small town along the ohio river in southeastern ohio commanders as an eternal flame which may have been up for dec
up. he will assess it objectively. he will make decisions based upon the data and apply the law. if you do that in this case, there is reasonable justification for continuation of the end exclusivity region of the end exclusivity ban. -- of the exclusivity ban. this is been the position in the proceeding. our order lasts until 2018. forever it applies to, it applies to. after that time, we should be treated like everybody else. if people believe that it is appropriate for it to continue, and they need to go back to congress and get different legislation. the current legislation does not support the ban and the current competitive posture. >> what happens when october 5 rolls around? do we suddenly see several? >> i do not think so. the fears had been overstated. i do not know for sure. the marketplace is that many of these networks require broad distribution to be successful. exclusivity marrow's this. to get the economic equivalent of a broadly distributed channel when you enter into an exclusive arrangement results and a large aphelion -- a feeling it. i am not sure what the a
, present and future of the nest its constitution. professor of law and political science at university. he teaches constitutional law at the college and law school. he received his b.a. and j.d. from yale and serves as an editor of the yale law journal. clerking for steven briar, he joined the faculty of yale in 1985. professor is co-editor of the leading constitutional law casebook, processes of the constitutional decision making and is the author of several of the books including the constitution in criminal procedure, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution and was really america's and written constitution, the precedents and principles will apply. the hon. clarence thomas has served as a justice of the supreme court for nearly 21 years. he attended seminary and received an ab from the college of the holy cross and j.d. from yale law school. serve as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977. legislative assistant to senator john denver from 1979 to 81. from 81-82 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of
's positions and their plans when it comes to your health. >> since president obama's health care law was enact aed, 3.1 million people under the age of 26 are now covered by their parents' plans and preventive care is covered 100% by insurance companies. seniors, in particular, have benefitted on prescription drugs. >> seniors who fall in the coverage gap known as the doughnut hole will start getting some help. they will receive $250 to help pay for prescriptions and that will, over time, fill in the doughnut hole. >> reporter: 5.5 million seniors have saved a total of nearly $4.5 billion on prescription day since the law was enact aed. that's according to the health and human services department. >> i have strengthened medicare and added years to the life of medicare and we did it by getting rid of taxpayer subsi y subsiddisubsidd subsidies. >> reporter: by 2014 everyone is required to have health insurance. insurers can't deny you if you have a pre-existing condition or reduce your rates. the law planned to expand medicaid to the states with the aim of covering 17 million more people. but t
.d. laws specifically target people who are most likely to vote for democrats. since 2011, 34 states introduced laws requiring photo id, and 9 states passed photo id laws. it turns out the only wide spread case come from a republican group. there's also stories of outright voter intimidation taking place. the koch brother funded group true the vote is engaging in a voter suppression effort in the state of ohio. according to the l.a. times, the names selected for purging include hundreds of college students, trailer park residents, homeless people and african-americans in counties president obama won in 2008. tonight the fox affiliate in denver, colorado is reporting the state republican party has terminated its relationship with the same voter registration firm accused of fraud down in the state of florida. it happened after this videotape surfaced of a young woman only registering voters who support mitt romney. >> i am polling people but do you vote for romney or obama? >> i thought you were registering voters a minute ago. >> i am, i am. >> and who are you registering? all voters?
of noncompliance of the state law and should be a policy of the commission for that provision. that's one thing. and the other thing i wanted to point out is that the agenda for tonight did not include the minutes. just said that you were going to vote for the minutes. it would be nice if you could put that to the next meeting for those of us who have not seen those have a period to comment. thank you. >> good afternoon, commissioner hur and ethic commissioners. i am troubled that you scheduled my two cases on today's agenda. it's unethical for the ethics commission to even decide a case involving your own executive director. and the whole case should have been transferred to another jurisdiction. not just for developing a recommendation. but for holding any sort of public hearing on the matter. mr. chatfield, when he transferred my case to san jose. noted in the cover mail, quote, the ethic's commission regularly handles cases for the sunshine force act. and however cannot be (inaudible) as executive director is the named respondent in both claims, end quote. it should be argued that the ethic
's actually 6724 that defines what records must be disclosed. the state law into what public information is. >> so i need 6724. >> 6724. >> 6724 actually tells you what -- >> okay. put that on the list for now. that is a fairly important issue though i think. as we define what the public records are, we need to be confident we have that right. >> through the chair an additional point on l. misnumbered l. i will be really brief. >> really brief. >> at the tail end of the sentence it says that a willful violation of sunshine ordinance by elected official or department head occurredment i think you are continuing to drop the key phrase of 6734, that it's elected official department head or city managerial employee. and you should not drop the term, managerial here or throughout the rest of the proposed recommendation. >> okay. referral. means a written document from the task force to the commission initiating an ethics commission complaint. i think that definition can be modified to reflect that the referral is a document from the task force finding a violation of the sunshine ordinance. >> ea
and state laws and authorities are clearer than ours is because this is a state law. however, this wasn't being done so i failed to follow-up and make sure that my directions were being followed and in fact, the practice is to send a letter to filing and then to send a second follow-up letter. when the second letters came from my signature it was already mid-august and i thought it was done months ago and that's my failure to follow through on that and i'm taking full responsibility for that but the practice should be and in the future will be that first we send people late letters and we can assign them up to ten dollars a day for being late. beyond a certain amount of time beyond that we have to assume they don't intend to file and that's when we should be doing referrals but it shouldn't take six months speaker: i /paoerb that and i appreciate what life is like really on the ground /skpw taking responsibility for it. the back and forth of writing to somebody remains private and if they are tossing all the letters then we're stuck in a box where nothing is going to change, commissione
will meet up. we may skirt the law and serve something before 6:00 a.m. the bookmobile, where are they? >> i have my cheat sheet here which i cannot find. the library has been here after great disasters. there has -- is a special book that won an award this year. here is the book. i downloaded it on my kindle. it can check out copies of the book mobile. nex>> thanks for being here. start walking slowly. welcome to san francisco, everyone. ♪
. the contracting ordinance from 2003 was based on 2003 hearings and federal law makes clear our contracting ordinances that give race and gender preferences must be based on recent hearings. the law -- that chapter, 12d.a has been joined since 2004. the board in 2008 extended the expiration of the ordinance based on the injunction. four years later the ordinance still has been staid, injection not lifted. it is not very clear that the board would need new fact-finding to continue the ordinance in effect. this simply cleans thaup and clears the way for future fact-finding. >> thank you very much. is there any public comment on this item? seeing none, closed. questions? move this forward with recommendation? >> so moved. >> we will make that the order without objection. mr. clerk, item 12. >> resolution determining the premises for transfer liquor license to -- 398-12th for the double rainbow. * >> mr. chair, supervisors, my name is mark rennie. i represent double rainbow llc. come on guys. who have made application for determination under 23958 of the business code that the issuance of a typ
to a suspicious fire at the private law office of vallejo mayor osby davis. christian is live on the building with a look at the damage and the investigation. christian. >> reporter: as you said, fire investigators are already saying this is a suspicious fire. now that the sun is rising we're getting a better look. you can see there's a lot of damage here. looking up you can see this is the office of osby davis. this is his private practice. looking inside the building you can see just how damaging this fire was. officials were inside just a couple of hours ago trying to figure out exactly how this fire started in the first place. crews responded to the fire here at about 1:30 this morning and say when they arrived, there was an intensifier and heavy smoke filling the building. and crews tell me they were able to confine that fire to the waiting room area but also say there's extensive smoke damage throughout the building. mayor0 bee davis was here early earlier this morning as his law office burned, as was michael thompson, the attorney who shares this office space. firefighters say the fire
university poll out this week asked about the forced ultrasound law passed by republicans in the legislature in virginia this year, signed into law by the republican governor in the state, bob mcdonnell. virginia voters opposed that law by 17 points. the anti-abortion crusade that has been undertaken this year by republican-led state government in virginia is not popular in virginia. and now virginia women are prepared to take it out on the presidency, right? they're planning to vote against the republicans' candidate for president in their state by 18 points. and that was the context for a really important move made by virginia's republican attorney general this week, a move that could be important for the presidential race in virginia. this week the attorney general certified a new set of regulations targeted only at abortion clinics in the united states. these rules are not just for oral surgeons or plastic surgery centers, just targeting abortion providers. it's red tape that is specifically designed to make it economically impossible to operate an abortion clinic in virginia. that's wha
that has become a hobby of mine and will be the brunt of a course in the fall in harvard law school is every student particularly at our so-called elite was schools which would lead students graduates to believe there's only one constitution in the entire united states to realize federal defaults that each stage has the constitution and one discovers contrary to the bad recruit at stake constitutions have, and remarkably interesting. and without exception more democratic than the united states constitution. there's a controversy among political scientists about the degree to which the united states constitution is continuing to serve as a model, what i find much more telling is the united states constitution, a remarkable and relatively non examined degree did not serve as a model for the state constitutions that were drafted in this country beginning around the turn of the nineteenth century. if you look at various new york constitutions and other constitutions you find dramatic differences. the new york constitution of 1846 for better or worse and when talking about constitutional
in the best of the west law enforcement competition. concord swat team made the top five and the sniper was first place. the competition included a course and shooting events that tested physical conditioning along with marksmanship. >> the governor signed a bill to limit carrying some guns openly in public. it bans the display of unloaded rifles and shot guns outside of a vehicle there. are exemptions for hunting and. it was written after some started carrying unloaded long guns in protest against other laws. >> locked out workers will be back on the job soon. last month a judge ruled the club had illegally locked out employees. they ordered them to bring them back and pay them badge wages estimated to be almost $2 million. now a union spokeswoman said they will be allowed to return on october 16th. >> apple ceo apologized today for its glitchy new mapping app. in a statement the ceo said apple is working to improve the app that replaced google maps on their products. users have reported disohrted imagines and wrong directions. until it's done he told customers to try other things l
of supervisors is very important to us. they make laws that we have to follow. it gives me great pleasure to introduce the president of the board of supervisors, david chiu. [applause] >> good afternoon. first, if any of you have ever wondered what an ls -- and elected officials sounds like with anesthesia and his mouth, i want to let you know that i got out of a dental chair 20 minutes ago after a few hours of dentists work. but i wanted to give a few remarks of how i think we are doing. i'm very much more are optimistic about how we're doing than four years ago. i read an article from the chronicle and it said that the candidates disagreed on everything, except for the need to crack down on entertainment violence. i did not propose anything for the first six months until there were half a dozen people affected. that was followed by a terrific shooting, which was then followed by an incident in union square. i want to take a moment and thank the san francisco police department for your input. if we pass legislation to require additional security requirements and plans. we pass legislatio
not having the license transfer to them should the modifications be declined. some of these laws on the books a little archaic, and i will give you an example. we now have live entertainment in san francisco, which allows amplified music until 10:00 p.m. if the conditions has no entertainment, and the entertainment, it also includes this limited live provision. we have determined in the city that this legislation is good -- good legislation. there's no conditional use requirement to have this. a lot of people today want to have food, drink, and be able to have some music. how can we get the limited live entertainment excluded from the know amplified or no live entertainment excluded on the transfers? >> that is going to mostly driven locally. most of the conditions you'll ever see on an abc license are because we rely, to a great extent, on the police department and local officials to determine what is best for their communities. i'm not trying to pin this on you guys or blame you guys, but we do try to work with you. we do not tend to want to overrule the police department very often. now th
that this body of law gives you the authority to order disclosure of records. or that you have the power to order anything that it's limited to record, and more broadly enforcement. let me conclude with a couple other things. >> you it turn it back on. >> the votes of three commissioners are required. what happens when you only have four commissioners present? does that mean that the matter dies? it doesn't address that and has a presumption built in there somewhere. i am not sure if that makes sense. and more importantly in terms of the administrative orders. nothing in here suggested that the commission could make a finding that a violation is willful. and that's to me the most important thing in 3764. if a commission finds that an act is willful, it shall be deemed so. >> i don't think we have gotten there. >> no? >> you are talking about willful violations that are -- you are talking about willful violations based on findings that are made by the task force. okay. >> or made by the commission. in any event, a finding if you look at 64.34, if the commission determines after the task force has
judge that wants to get re-elected and has no bearing in law. the judge is flat out wrong. the united states supreme court has spoken on this back in the year 2000, santa fe v. john doe. you cannot give the impression that a public school is sponsoring prayer or religion. you just can't do it. that's how it is. it's open and shut, black and white. the school is going to shut down and they're not going to be allowed to do that. you want to bring posters in the stands, you can do that. but the students can't lead the charge and that's what's going to be stopped here. >> avery, why do you see this as laughable and what is this hearing all about then? >> well, what's laughable is that you got it exactly right. the amazing thing about this -- >> you're in agreement. >> no, sometimes, richard, you get it right. and he is right. the fact is the law is absolutely clear on this. look, it's a local state judge. you have to know east texas. this is not austin, this is the beaumont area and i understand. there is no constitutional way a judge can stop the school district from barring these signs.
. mississippi paid 11% of the poverty line, but legally obligated to get under federal law to make welfare available to people who came and applied for it. what's happened? well, let me tell you what's happened in this recession. it's really astone -- astonishing. food stamps was at 26 million people in 2007, 26.3 million. in the last five years, that's gone up to 46 million people. in other words, food stamps works. that's why mrs. gingrich called president obama the food stamp president because we had a program working to help people in the recession. he is the food stamp president, that's great. although, and food stamps were raised in the recovery act, the stimulus legislation, and that was a very, very good thing. now, why did they go up? because people had a legal right to get that when they went into the office to apply, had to be done. welfare, now temporary assistance for needy families, tanf, no longer a legal right. go in, you look healthy, you look like you can work, they can say whatever they want, there'si no obligation to do that. in the recession, tanf went up from 3.9 mill
coming up in my full forecast. >>ysabel: arson investigators are at the scene of a fire at law office. >> fire investigators are wrapping up after a very long morning. this is after a fire broke out around 1:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. . m.. fire crews were able to with the fire out quickly. it is is no one was here. arson investigators were on scene quickly. this is going to be a long investigation fury the fire chief was out here a little bit ago. >> heavy smoke and fire. >> we hope we have more information to come. >> the fire out here is the one earlier this morning. we can see the fire chiefs assuring them that they will do everything to get to the bottom of this. half of the top priority will be who did this and why. >>ysabel: san francisco police reported last night's event was peaceful and there were no a raft. it is not sure how many people showed up. last night was the 20th anniversary of critical mass. >> they're shutting down the entire city. >> one driver was tired of waiting risking hitting people on their bikes. others could not do anything but wait. hall pedestrians c
? >> it was something. >> reporter: he's smt suspected murder of keith reed. law enforcement believes it may have been a love triangle. >> i don't know. the guy lost it. >> just before his capture this evening, the u.s. marshal service warned that he had firearms and training 234 t ini marines. >> will you ever forget today? >> no. . >> reporter: why not? >> it was exciting. >> reporter: well, a lot of folks tell me that they will never forget today. as for antny ta grksz lionetti, they will eventually turn him over to new york law offers. n >> police are on the hunt for this man. it happened in silver spring this afternoon. the man grabbed the boy outside claiming to be a police officer. a mcdonalds security officer jumped in. >>> a student faces charges in a fight at a football game. richards is still hospitalized tonight. tonight, extra security is on hand. >> a worker being called a hero. darren washington is the station manager at the roslyn station. he saw a 55-year-old man collapse near the ticket county. he called for the nearby day fib ri later and applied a shoek. >> she came back. i saw him
aspect of this. the traditional kind of law of war, nation state analysis does not work here in many respects. i think it is time for that nations of the world to have an opportunity to come together and look at a global convention or something of that sort that deals with the need to have a safe cyber environment for everyone's mutual benefit. it is not just about the united states. it is about the countries of the world. >> and that could look like >> the could look like a treaty? >> it could look like any kind of framework. >> steve put yourself in the camp of people in very senior physicians who look at cyber weapons as strategic weapons? you start drawing these analogies to the cold war, the nuclear arms race. the see if the playbacks -- see it that way? >> there is a lot of hot talk. >> it is washington, d.c. >> of questions i want to ask the go back to the executive order. where does the president authority begin and end, regarding a cyber executive order? can he issue the lieberman bill, as an executive order? and you have answered the second part of the harder. the president
as a community service, i host a radio and tv program called "folk law for ordinary folk," it's a very tough one in the sense that workers at some point are essentially giving up higher salary and higher pay in exchange for those pension benefits. so to come back later on and essentially cut that out from under them, the question is one of fairness and of equity. that being said, as far as police and firefighters, obviously those are public safety areas and it's a little bit different in the sense that we definitely need to protect those pensions in a different manner than we do others. as far as other ways to save, i would certainly look at capping pensions moving forward, so that they don't increase incrementally over time. i think we need to put a cap on that now before it starts to burgeon and get out of control. >> thank you. >> miss olague. >> i believe i was one of the individuals who answered no. i don't think we should balance the budget on the back of the workforce, and there was prop c. prop b was the adachi measure and proper c was a lot of pension reform where the unions and the
to respond to it. you saw this week, he touted his health care law in massachusetts, which was a little awkward for him. but he's kind of showing that he does have an empathetic side. but meanwhile the obama campaign is also coming back. they're releasing new web ad this morning. they're slamming him for bain again for his private equity experience. so i think you're going to see these themes recurring again and again. >> okay. good to see you both as always. thank you. >>> we're going to go now to the weekend weather forecast and get a live look at new york city. and there we have nbc meteorologist -- that's part of new york city. but doesn't look like the usual beautiful view. that's really pretty. look at that. central park kind of nice. >> very nice. >> that's the usual spot right there. we see times square, which is pretty empty this time of day. good morning to you. >> good morning to you, too. nice to see a little greenery first thing on a saturday morning. in new york city. even with the fog, that mist, that drizzle that mist in the air. we're going to see some improvements as w
one can stop you. no one could stop me." that is, except the law. when police arrested him five months ago in jalalabad during the planning of the attack. he's now awaiting trial. proudly a member of the taliban, he says no one encouraged him to do this. "look at our situation. the foreigners kill our people. insult our religion. burning the holy koran and making cartoons of our prophet mohammed. if we don't defend islam, then we are not muslim." suicide bombings and other attacks are now daily currencies in the war in afghanistan. and the methods of the insurgents are constantly changing, according to the prison boss, general muhammad khan. "the enemy don't use their own tactics. now they use women. sometimes children and teenagers. they even get dressed up in military uniforms. they don't fight face to face. they're coward." the taliban denies recruiting children as suicide bombers. the facts tell a very different story. authorities say just a few days ago a 10-year-old orphan boy managed to escape from insurgents who were going to make him wear a suicide vest so he could blow himsel
insensitive to the law and the demand for the protection of the environment. the american people want their children educated. they want to get our edge back in science, and they want a policy headed by the president that helps close this gap that's widening between the united states and europe and japan. the american people want to keep opening doors. they want those civil rights laws enforced. they want the equal rights amendment ratified. they want equal pay for comparable effort for women. and they want it because they've understood from the beginning that when we open doors, we're all stronger, just as we were at the olympics. i think as you make the case, the american people will increasingly come to our cause. itmr. mondale, isn't possible that the american people have heard your message -- and they are listening -- but they are rejecting it? >> well, tonight we had the first debate over the deficit. the president says it'll disappear automatically. i've said it's going to take some work. i think the american people will draw their own conclusions. secondly, i've said that i wi
're the first to tell you why. tonight, we have the likely reason and we have it from a top law enforcement official. four americans as you know were murdered in the assault, one american ambassador, christopher stevens. that was two and a half weeks ago. two and a half weeks that have seen the administration first describe this as a spontaneous outburst even though our reporting revealed that officials knew within 24 hours that it was not. only much later did they back away from that assessment. today, the director of national intelligence, james clapper, put out a statement explaining that early evidence supported that theory so that's why they told the white house and congress. clapper says that throughout the investigation, his agency made it clear that the assessment was preliminary and could change. neither his statement nor our sources specify a time frame for the dni's change of view. again, our sources tell us that law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours that this was a terror attack. our reporting also reveals that even though the administration says the investigation is go
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